Greens

"It isn't easy being green" according to Kermit the Frog. However, he certainly has a lot of choices of what shade of green to be with Turbo Dork paints. There are five Metallics, one Zenishift, and ten Turboshifts that are listed as at least partially displaying some shade of green. What better way to honor Kermit than to use a set of frogs for this blog. Please note, though, that they do not sing and cannot ride a bike.

This post is a continuation of those featuring a specific color range with an emphasis on individual differences and subset comparisons. All of the examples shown here used a matte black primer except as specifically noted.  

I have chosen to not include all of the Turboshifts here, but rather to focus on those that have a pure primary green color. Therefore, 4D Glasses, Laserface, Shell Shocked, and Sky Rat, have been left for another day.

Matcha:

Matcha is one of the metallic Omakase pastels and like the others in the bundle requires the use of a white primer to obtain the pale color shown below. Matcha works well both as a highlight over other paints, particularly for edging, but also on its own as shown in the photo.

 

 

 

Absinthe:

Absinthe was introduced as part of the metallic group called Bright Lights. These paints were advertised as being able to be used over any color primer, but being particularly "bright" over white. As shown below, Absinthe over white is a vivid aquamarine (top photo), while over black it is more of sea green (bottom photo).

 

 

 

Sea Food:

Going back to the previous marine analogy, Sea Food is truly like seafoam in color. It is a soft green metallic with a bit of blue mixed in.

 

 

 

Malum Malus:

Malum Malus is yellow-green, sort of like a cross between a Granny Smith and a Golden Delicious. In any case, it is one bad metallic apple.

 

 

Gordian Knot and Twin Sons:

Gordian Knot (top photo) is a pure, dark green metallic --- a true froggy color, and as the product description says "the successor to the late great Emerald Nightmare". It has become my go-to when I want a solid green color or a highlight for something like Forrest Flux.

Over a black primer, Twin Sons (bottom photo) is very similar in tone to Gordian Knot. However, it is a bit muddier with the potential for some blue to show through. The real difference is that Twin Sons, as a zenishift, shows up as bright blue over a white primer. In this case, the throat of the frog in the photo below was primed with white. 

 

 

 

Dark Net and Grave Robber:

Dark Net (top photo) was one of the first Turboshifts to be released and initially one of the most popular. It is a medium green with a shift to chocolate.

As shown in the bottom photo, Grave Robber is also a green-brown shift but much darker overall than Dark Net. In addition, under some light conditions, there is a suggestion of blue with Grave Robber that is missing in Dark Net.

 

 

 

Electrum and Radium:

There is a story behind Electrum (top photo) and Radium (bottom photo) that relates to an accidental switch in the pigments used for the first batches of these two green-gold Turboshifts. The intent was to name each for the metal that it looked like, but now they bear the name of the other. 

Electrum does not glow green like radioactive radium but it is primarily green with a subtle shift to something warm.

Radium slowly shifts from yellow gold to green with a kind of a tarnished brassy look just like naturally occurring electrum.

 

 

Forrest Flux and Scarab:

Forrest Flux shifts between three different colors --- forest green to blue and finally to purple. However, the color changes can be fairly subtle with green predominating.

Scarab is primarily emerald green with a shift to dark blue. The blue is most prominent around the edges of the figure. Scarab is perfect for creating a beetle shell effect.

 

 

 

Conclusions:

While this post introduces most of the Turbo Dork greens, it barely hints at ways in which one can mix and match them. Embrace your inner green and experiment. Ribbit!